Space and Aviation
Customized Models
Made to Order Models
Maritime Models
Civilian and Commercial
Vessels
Military Ships and Boats
Half-Hull and 
Half Models
Plaques and 
Vehicles
Specialty Items
Find your Model
Payments Options
Civilian Aviation.
Comercial Aviation.
Military Aviation.
Helicopter.
Site Search.
Civilian Aviation.
Comercial Aviation.
Air Force.
Army Air Corps.
Navy and Marines.
Trainers.
Rotorcrafts.
Space Exploration.
Power Yacht.
Sail Yacht.
Classic Sail Boats.
Commercial and Passenger Vessels.
Aircraft Carriers.
Amphibious Ships.
Auxiliaries and Service Vessels.
Battle Ships.
Cruisers.
Destroyers.
Destroyer Escorts.
Escort Carriers.
Frigates.
Iron Clads.
Landing Crafts.
Mine Crafts.
PT Boats.
Patrol Crafts.
Submarines.
Tall Ships.
USCG Boats & Cutters.
Half-Hull.
Half Models.
Plaques.
Military Vehicles.
Civilian Vehicles.
One of a Kind Models.
Weapons & Ammunitions.
Clear Canopy.
All rights reserved copyright © Aero-Nautique Models
Home.
Contact Us.
About Us.
Made to Order.
Custom Order.
How to Order.
Payment Options.
Privacy Policy.
Made to Order Civilian Aviation
Back <<.
Sku:   KDBF

Model Name:   DE HAVILLAND BEAVER ON FLOATS

Manufacturer:   DE HAVILLAND

Price: Contact Us
History:
The de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver is a single engined, high wing, propeller-driven, STOL aircraft developed by de Havilland Canada, primarily known as a bush plane. It is used for cargo and passenger hauling, aerial application (crop dusting and aerial topdressing), and has been widely adopted by armed forces as a utility aircraft. The United States Army purchased several hundred; nine DHC-2s are still in service with the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary (Civil Air Patrol) for search and rescue. A Royal New Zealand Air Force Beaver supported Sir Edmund Hillary's expedition to the South Pole. Over 1,600 Beavers were produced until 1967 when the original line shut down.

Due to its success, the Royal Canadian Mint commemorated the Beaver on a special edition Canadian quarter in November 1999.

Despite the fact that production ceased in 1967, hundreds of Beavers are still flying—many of them heavily modified to adapt to changes in technology and needs. Kenmore Air of Kenmore, Washington provides Beaver and Otter airframes with zero-hour fatigue-life ratings, and owns dozens of supplemental type certificates (STCs) for aircraft modifications. These modifications are so well-known and desirable in the aviation community, rebuilt Beavers are often called "Kenmore Beavers" or listed as having "Kenmore mods" installed.

The original Wasp Jr radial engine of the Beaver is long out of production, so repair parts are getting harder to find. Some aircraft conversion stations have addressed this problem by replacing the piston engine with a turboprop engine such as the PT6. The added power and lighter installed weight, together with greater availability of kerosene fuel instead of high-octane aviation gasoline, make this a desirable modification, but at a high financial cost.