Space and Aviation
Customized Models
Made to Order Models
Maritime Models
Civilian and Commercial
Vessels
Military Ships and Boats
Half-Hull and 
Half Models
Plaques and 
Vehicles
Specialty Items
Find your Model
Payments Options
Civilian Aviation.
Comercial Aviation.
Military Aviation.
Helicopter.
Site Search.
Civilian Aviation.
Comercial Aviation.
Air Force.
Army Air Corps.
Navy and Marines.
Trainers.
Rotorcrafts.
Space Exploration.
Power Yacht.
Sail Yacht.
Classic Sail Boats.
Commercial and Passenger Vessels.
Aircraft Carriers.
Amphibious Ships.
Auxiliaries and Service Vessels.
Battle Ships.
Cruisers.
Destroyers.
Destroyer Escorts.
Escort Carriers.
Frigates.
Iron Clads.
Landing Crafts.
Mine Crafts.
PT Boats.
Patrol Crafts.
Submarines.
Tall Ships.
USCG Boats & Cutters.
Half-Hull.
Half Models.
Plaques.
Military Vehicles.
Civilian Vehicles.
One of a Kind Models.
Weapons & Ammunitions.
Clear Canopy.
All rights reserved copyright © Aero-Nautique Models
Home.
Contact Us.
About Us.
Made to Order.
Custom Order.
How to Order.
Payment Options.
Privacy Policy.
Made to Order Space Exploration
Back <<.
Model Name:   X-43 HYPER

Manufacturer:   NASA

Price: Contact Us
History:
The X-43 is an unmanned experimental hypersonic aircraft with multiple planned scale variations meant to test various aspects of hypersonic flight. It was part of NASA's Hyper-X program. It has set several airspeed records for jet-propelled aircraft.

A winged booster rocket with the X-43 itself at the tip, called a "stack", is launched from a carrier plane. After the booster rocket (a modified first stage of the Pegasus rocket) brings the stack to the target speed and altitude, it is discarded, and the X-43 flies free using its own engine, a scramjet.

The X-43A aircraft was a small unpiloted test vehicle measuring just over 3.7 m in length. The vehicle was a lifting body design, where the body of the aircraft provides a significant amount of lift for flight, rather than relying on wings. The aircraft weighed roughly 3,000 pounds (about 1,300 kilograms). The X-43A was designed to be fully controllable in high-speed flight, even when gliding without propulsion. However, the aircraft was not designed to land and be recovered. Test vehicles crashed into the Pacific Ocean when the test was over.

Traveling at Mach speeds produces a lot of heat due to the compression shock waves involved in supersonic drag. At high Mach speeds, heat can become so intense that metal portions of the airframe melt. The X-43A compensated for this by cycling water behind the engine cowl and sidewall leading edges, cooling those surfaces. In tests, the water circulation was activated at about Mach 3. In the future, fuel may be cycled through such areas instead, much like what is currently done in many liquid-fuel rocket nozzles and high speed planes such as the SR-71.